There’s No Such Thing As Real Value … It’s All Perceived

There’s no such thing as real value … it’s all perceived.  It’s true … and I’ll prove it with an example.

Story Version A:

houseA man and his wife decide to sell their family home in Liverpool that they’ve lived in for the last 70 years.  The woman was born there and when her parents grew older she loved it so much that she convinced her husband that they should take it over.  They had spent many happy years there and had accumulated (as well do) lots of things, a number of which were stored in the attic.

Whilst they were cleaning it out they discovered a couple of old acoustic guitars, covered in dust and in need of a bit of t.l.c.  She remembered her brother playing with them with his friends and the fun they had with the guitars.  In particular, she recalled one that occasionally one of the boys wouldn’t have his own guitar and so one of them would forever be playing one of her brother’s 2 guitars.  Whilst there had been lots of talk about starting a band the woman’s brother lost interest and the guitars got resigned to a cupboard and eventually to the attic.

Despite the fond memories, they dusted the guitars off and decided to take them to a car boot sale along with other unwanted items.  The car boot sale was a success and the couple raised £5 for each of the guitars which the new owners was very happy with.  One had bought it to learn how to play herself and whilst it needed new strings and a good clean up the new owner considered it to be excellent value for money.  The second was purchased by a man whose son wanted to learn and with a history of not really sticking at things the purchaser didn’t want to buy a new one.

Story B:

A man and his wife decide to sell their family home in Liverpool that they’ve lived in for the last 70 years.  The woman was born there and when her parents grew older she loved it so much that she convinced her husband that they should take it over.  They had spent many happy years there and had accumulated (as well do) lots of things, a number of which were stored in the attic.

guitarWhilst they were cleaning it out they discovered a couple of old acoustic guitars, covered in dust and in need of a bit of t.l.c.  She remembered her brother playing with them with his friends and the fun they had with the guitars.  In particular, she recalled one that occasionally one of the boys wouldn’t have his own guitar and so one of them would forever be playing one of her brother’s 2 guitars.  Whilst there had been lots of talk about starting a band her brother lost interest and the guitars got resigned to a cupboard and eventually to the attic.

Speaking with her brother about the guitars they recalled that amongst the other boys that played the guitars was a cheeky young chap by the name of John Lennon.  Whilst the guitars had been long forgotten, the fond memories came flooding back including a recollection of a photo showing the boys playing the guitars in the garden of the family home.  The guitars were discussed with an auction house and sold for over £250,000 each.  Both new owners considered them to be excellent for money.

The guitars are the same; it’s the story that creates the value for the buyer.  How good is your story?

Learn how the most successful salespeople sell their higher priced products so you can achieve better results now!  Click here for details on my ebook How to Sell Successfully at Your Higher Price module.

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About trenthamwhitmore

Salesperson, trainer, author, speaker, student and forever curious about what makes elite salespeople so much more successful than their contempories.
This entry was posted in Differentiating Yourself and Your Offer, Justifying Your Price, Selling Parables and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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